Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

1 How Time-Travel Stories Borrow from Einstein2016-12-19 21:04:07
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2 Abou Farman on Leonor Caraballo’s “Vision”2016-12-05 17:27:33
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3 Canaries in the Coal Smoke2016-11-21 16:10:19
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4 Now We're Cooking with Math2016-11-07 20:57:44
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5 This is Your Brain on Art2016-10-11 16:17:44
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6 The Science of Singing2016-09-26 21:01:14
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7 How to Fly to Alpha Centauri2016-09-13 22:20:34
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8 Will Your Next Car Fly?2016-08-15 21:14:11
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9 Museum of God2016-08-01 18:28:22
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10 Sexy Robots2016-07-18 18:25:46
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11 Boldly Going Where No TV Prop Has Gone Before2016-07-05 22:01:46
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12 Music Heals2016-06-21 18:07:10
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13 Two Artists Let the Animals Speak for Themselves2016-05-25 16:01:41
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14 The Neuroscience of Creative Flow2016-05-17 18:47:48
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15 Imaginary Friends Forever2016-04-11 20:28:28
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16 How Creative Are You?2016-03-28 20:18:28
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17 For a Black Writer, Sci-Fi Offers a Reboot of Society2016-03-07 19:43:07
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For a Black Writer, Sci-Fi Offers a Reboot of Society

Few readers of science fiction can name any African-American writers in the genre apart from Samuel Delaney and Octavia Butler. Black authors, however, have been contributing to sci-fi since its inception.  Carl Hancock Rux is a playwright, performer, and musician; his first novel, Asphalt, was set in a post-apocalyptic New York. Where the uses and misuses of technology have been central to mainstream sci-fi, Rux believes that, “for writers of African descent, science fiction has offered a unique place to try out something unthinkable in realistic fiction: an end to America’s tortured history with race."  Excerpts from M.P. Shiel’s The Purple Cloud were read by Reg E. Cathey; the music in this story was composed by Carl Hancock Rux and Daniel Bernard Roumain.…read more

18 The Real Scientists of Hollywood2016-02-23 17:06:15
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19 Artists and Scientists Collide at CERN2016-02-09 20:17:58
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20 Virtual Reality Starts Getting Real2016-01-26 17:42:52
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