Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

61 Warming Oceans, Threatened Cities2014-09-22 21:52:03
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62 Aha Moment: Star Trek2014-09-15 18:32:43
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63 Method in the Madness2014-09-08 17:20:47
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64 Future Tense2014-08-25 22:58:27
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65 Magic Eye Paintings2014-08-11 19:26:00
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66 Annalee Newitz: The Future is Coming to Get You2014-07-14 22:13:06
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67 Toxic Materials2014-06-02 18:25:47
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68 Drinking and Smoking: Do They Make You More Creative?2014-04-21 18:08:21
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69 Plastics2014-04-07 21:56:45
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70 Symmetry and Sex Appeal2014-03-24 16:38:58
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71 A Dance Piece that Takes You Inside the Heart2014-03-17 18:41:52
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72 Philip Seymour Hoffman's Final Performance Will Be Digitally Created2014-03-10 16:53:31
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73 Seeing Sound: Synesthetic Art2014-03-03 18:13:59
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74 You're Living in a Science Fiction Story2014-02-10 18:11:14
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75 Kirk to Enterprise: the Piece of Star Trek in Your Pocket2014-02-03 18:38:29
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76 Chris Hadfield: How to Brush Your Teeth in Space2014-01-27 17:01:44
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Chris Hadfield: How to Brush Your Teeth in Space

Chris Hadfield’s recent cover of David Bowie’s classic song “Space Oddity” has more than 20 million views on YouTube. And not because of Hadfield’s voice (which isn’t bad, for an astronaut). Commander Hadfield was singing the song in space aboard the International Space Station. He describes the video as “a bending of science fiction and science fact.” Social media has changed what it means to be an astronaut. Tweeting and blogging in space earned Hadfield millions of fans back on Earth — and they had a ton of questions. So Hadfield started producing videos demonstrating how he brushes his teeth or what happens totears without gravity. He even earned a fan in his childhood hero, Captain James T. Kirk. “I had a long phone call back and forth with … I guess I can call him Bill Shatner now,” Hadfield says. “He wasn’t interested in talking about things that happened 40 years ago on TV. He was interested in what’s going on, what’s happening on-station, where are we headed next, what’s the purpose of it, what’s the actual experience like?” …read more

77 Narrative Medicine2014-01-13 21:38:41
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78 Origin Lessons2014-01-06 18:02:34
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79 Tendues and Torque2013-12-09 18:18:00
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80 3D Printing: Dawn of a Revolution2013-11-25 19:21:45
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