Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

41 Mind Games: Designing With EEG2015-05-04 16:47:31
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42 How Do You Draw Dark Matter?2015-04-27 16:36:22
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43 Greg Stock: Redesigning Humans2015-04-13 17:25:49
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44 The Posthuman Future2015-04-06 18:43:37
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45 Backup Singers Bring the Hits2015-03-30 15:56:42
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46 What if Mondrian Were a Programmer?2015-03-24 16:01:13
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47 The Neuroscience of Jazz2015-03-09 17:06:08
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48 Big Data and Culturomics2015-03-02 18:18:59
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49 Can Drugs Make Your Brain More Creative?2015-02-23 17:35:40
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50 Hacking the Climate2015-02-17 19:36:32
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51 Making Music for Animals2015-02-10 16:40:35
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52 The Science of Sculpture2015-02-03 15:17:16
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53 Want to Be Creative? Try Getting Bored2015-01-26 20:34:56
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Want to Be Creative? Try Getting Bored

When Manoush Zomorodi was eight years old, she walked around her house gathering up all the houseplants. She arranged them in rows, gave them all name tags, and then performed a concert for their benefit. Why? Because she was bored. But Zomorodi — host of WNYC’s podcast New Tech City — says her kids will never do anything so charmingly pointless, because old-fashioned boredom is a thing of the past, for fidgety kids as well as their parents. “When I’m on the subway, I look at my phone,” she tells Kurt Andersen. “When I walk down the street, I look at my phone. Is that bad? Is there a consequence to not having that time when you are literally getting bored?” A growing body of research suggests that there is. Neuroscientists have seen fMRI evidence of organized, spontaneous thinking when the brain is supposedly idle. “When you’re given nothing to do, it certainly seems like your thoughts don’t stop,” says Jonny Smallwood, professor of neuroscience at the University of York. “[You] continue to generate thought even when there’s nothing for you to do with the thought.”…read more

54 Billboard Top Five, But for Whales2015-01-05 17:17:26
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55 Alan Turing, Man and Myth2014-11-24 18:26:55
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56 Making Memories with a Microchip2014-11-10 18:42:53
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57 They're Made Out of Meat2014-10-27 18:58:05
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58 Power Cart2014-10-21 15:54:52
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59 Spencer Wells: Making Maps From DNA2014-10-06 22:38:11
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60 10,000 Year Clock2014-09-29 21:04:08
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