Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

101 Listener Challenge: Remixing Spring2013-03-04 16:56:30
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102 Darci: A Computer with Great Taste2013-02-27 15:31:03
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103 Caught in Tomas Saraceno's Web2013-02-20 19:29:51
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104 Making Portraits Out of DNA2013-02-11 19:12:16
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105 Down and Dirty at the Museum of Math?2013-02-04 17:03:47
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106 True Story: Keeping Memories Safe2013-01-28 17:49:41
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107 The Where, The Why, and The How2013-01-23 17:30:53
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108 How America Fell for the Mars Rover2013-01-14 17:02:00
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109 Jaron Lanier: You Are Not a Network2013-01-07 17:12:15
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110 Imaginary Friends Forever2012-12-31 16:05:28
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111 Gary Marcus: Enhancing Creativity2012-12-17 16:32:41
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112 The Neuroscience of Jazz2012-12-10 17:06:18
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The Neuroscience of Jazz

Charles Limb is a professor of otolaryngology at Johns Hopkins Medicine who has a sideline in brain research; he’s also on the faculty at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. He wants to know what happens in our brains when we play piano. Simple: stick a musician in an fMRI machine, and see what happens. Not so simple, actually. The machines are magnetic, so Limb had a special keyboard made using no magnetic metal parts. “You’re laying on your back and he’s got a double mirror,” says Mike Pope, a jazz pianist who participated in the study. “Your head is in a cradle kind of thing — a cage, actually — you’re crammed in there. Your knees are up in the air a little bit and you’re seeing the keyboard laying on your knees. They shove you all the way into the tube and you’re just in there, just enough movement to move your arm, essentially.” The conditions are hardly conducive to a great performance, but quality isn’t the point. It’s the design of Limb’s study that is innovative. He has a pianist first play scales; then play a learned melody over a backing track; and then improvise over the track. This way, he separates out the creative part from the more rote aspects of a performance. He studies the images to see what’s changing in the brain during these distinct musical tasks.…read more

113 Gary Marcus: Defining Creativity2012-12-03 17:10:33
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114 How Creative Are You?2012-11-26 17:12:25
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115 Faking It: Photoshop Dissolves Reality2012-11-19 17:19:28
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116 Big Eyes2012-11-13 18:39:44
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117 Your Brain on Videogames2012-11-05 16:53:37
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118 The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics2012-10-22 17:04:17
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119 Lydia Millet2012-10-15 16:53:55
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120 DJ Scientific2012-10-01 18:35:46
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