Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

21 A Neuroscientist Throws Science Overboard for Art2015-08-10 04:00:00
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22 A Quantified Artist Turns Her Data Into Sculpture2015-07-24 14:38:29
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23 Bringing Female Heroes to the LEGO Universe2015-07-13 22:18:26
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24 Synthetic Biology In Pop Culture2015-06-29 17:04:38
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25 Blood Music2015-06-22 16:03:04
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26 The Ethics of Synthetic Biology2015-06-15 16:24:13
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27 Bio Art2015-06-08 17:15:49
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28 A Crash Course in Designing Life2015-06-01 17:39:08
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29 Bacteria Biofuel2015-05-18 19:54:54
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30 The Day After2015-05-11 18:02:12
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31 Mind Games: Designing With EEG2015-05-04 16:47:31
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32 How Do You Draw Dark Matter?2015-04-27 16:36:22
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33 Greg Stock: Redesigning Humans2015-04-13 17:25:49
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34 The Posthuman Future2015-04-06 18:43:37
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The Posthuman Future

To make art, a computer first needs to understand what art is.  A group of computer scientists at Brigham Young University is attempting this by feeding their program images by the thousands and describing those images. Digital Artist Communicating Intent (she goes by DARCI) recognizes about 2,000 adjectives so far, including terms like peaceful, scary, and dark. The goal is to teach DARCI to pick out those visual qualities in artwork — and ultimately, to write algorithms modeling creativity for artificial intelligence.  Last month, the team took DARCI out for a spin at the Conference on Creativity and Cognition in Atlanta. They invited artists to put their work on a thumb drive, upload to the program, and be judged by DARCI. The program scored works according to simple criteria, which were kept secret; the accepted work was displayed in a temporary exhibition at the High Museum. Several experienced artists had their work rejected; so did George, age six, who was skeptical of the algorithmic curation. “I can’t believe a computer can do it, because there's never good art or bad art — there's different types of art,” he says. BYU professor Dan Ventura says their effort wasn’t much different from the normal operation of the art world. “Whenever you enter art into a juried show, you're often not told what the criteria are,” he reasons. “Somebody is going to make a judgment about your art and decides whether you get in or not. And DARCI is that someone right now.”. …read more

35 Backup Singers Bring the Hits2015-03-30 15:56:42
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36 What if Mondrian Were a Programmer?2015-03-24 16:01:13
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37 Can Drugs Make Your Brain More Creative?2015-02-23 17:35:40
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38 Hacking the Climate2015-02-17 19:36:32
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39 Making Music for Animals2015-02-10 16:40:35
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40 The Science of Sculpture2015-02-03 15:17:16
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