Science and Creativity from Studio 360

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

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Science and Creativity from Studio 360

21 A Neuroscientist Throws Science Overboard for Art2015-08-10 04:00:00
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22 A Quantified Artist Turns Her Data Into Sculpture2015-07-24 14:38:29
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23 Bringing Female Heroes to the LEGO Universe2015-07-13 22:18:26
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24 Synthetic Biology In Pop Culture2015-06-29 17:04:38
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25 Blood Music2015-06-22 16:03:04
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26 The Ethics of Synthetic Biology2015-06-15 16:24:13
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27 Bio Art2015-06-08 17:15:49
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28 A Crash Course in Designing Life2015-06-01 17:39:08
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29 Bacteria Biofuel2015-05-18 19:54:54
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30 The Day After2015-05-11 18:02:12
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31 Mind Games: Designing With EEG2015-05-04 16:47:31
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32 How Do You Draw Dark Matter?2015-04-27 16:36:22
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33 Greg Stock: Redesigning Humans2015-04-13 17:25:49
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34 The Posthuman Future2015-04-06 18:43:37
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35 Backup Singers Bring the Hits2015-03-30 15:56:42
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36 What if Mondrian Were a Programmer?2015-03-24 16:01:13
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37 Can Drugs Make Your Brain More Creative?2015-02-23 17:35:40
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38 Hacking the Climate2015-02-17 19:36:32
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Hacking the Climate

The idea of geoengineering — tampering with the Earth’s climate to fit our needs — has been a favorite trope of science fiction since the 1920s. In the 1970s, Carl Sagan speculated that we could terraform Mars to make it into a second Earth. That inspired novelist Kim Stanley Robinson to write his Mars trilogy — Red Mars, Green Mars, and Blue Mars — in which he imagines how that scenario would play out. Robinson relied on actual science — and there’s plenty on this subject. As the dangers of climate change become imminently clear, some scientists believe that geoengineering’s time has come — not on Mars, but on Earth. Yale professor and atmospheric scientist Trude Storelvmo studies cirrus clouds, which tend to trap heat in the atmosphere. She analyzes what would happen if the clouds were seeded with ice crystals that would thin them. “If you don’t put enough of these seeding particles into the upper atmosphere, you would get no effect at all,” Storelvmo says. “But if you put too much, you could actually have the opposite effect, which would obviously be disastrous.”…read more

39 Making Music for Animals2015-02-10 16:40:35
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40 The Science of Sculpture2015-02-03 15:17:16
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