99% Invisible

Description

Design is everywhere in our lives, perhaps most importantly in the places where we’ve just stopped noticing. 99% Invisible is a weekly exploration of the process and power of design and architecture. From award winning producer Roman Mars. Learn more at 99percentinvisible.org. A proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

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99% Invisible

Roman Mars
1 279- The Containment Plan2017-10-10 23:14:13
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2 278- The Athletic Brassiere2017-10-03 23:13:42
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3 277- Ponte City Tower2017-09-26 17:29:10
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4 276- The Finnish Experiment2017-09-19 21:14:13
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5 275- Coal Hogs Work Safe2017-09-12 22:14:40
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6 274- The Age of the Algorithm2017-09-05 23:45:54
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7 273- Notes on an Imagined Plaque2017-08-29 21:47:20
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8 272- Person in Lotus Position2017-08-22 21:13:02
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9 271- The Great Dismal Swamp2017-08-15 22:42:25
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271- The Great Dismal Swamp

On the border of Virginia and North Carolina stretches a great, dismal swamp. The Great Dismal Swamp, actually — that’s the name British colonists gave it centuries ago. The swamp covers about 190 square miles today, but at its peak, before parts of it were drained and developed, it was around ten times bigger, spanning roughly 2,000 square miles of Virginia and North Carolina. And it’s understandable why people called the swamp “dismal.” Temperatures can reach over 100 degrees. It’s humid and soggy, filled with thorns and thickets, teeming with all sorts of dangerous and unpleasant wildlife. The panthers that used to live there are now gone, but even today there are black bears, poisonous snakes, and swarms of yellow flies and mosquitoes. Hundreds of years ago, before the Civil War, the dangers of the swamp and its seeming impenetrability actually attracted people to it. The land was so untamed that horses and boats couldn’t enter, and the colonists who were filing into the region detested it. William Byrd II, a Virginia planter, called it “a miserable morass where nothing can inhabit.” But people did inhabit the swamp, including thousands of enslaved Africans and African Americans who escaped their captors and formed communities in the swamp. This “dismal” landscape was the site of one of the most remarkable and least told stories of resistance to slavery in American history. The Great Dismal Swamp …read more

10 270- The Stethoscope2017-08-09 01:09:48
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11 269- Ways of Hearing2017-08-01 23:39:13
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12 268- El Gordo2017-07-25 18:04:57
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13 267- The Trials of Dan and Dave2017-07-18 23:55:45
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14 266- Repackaging the Pill2017-07-11 22:45:33
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15 265- The Pool and the Stream2017-07-04 21:27:03
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16 264- Mexico 682017-06-27 21:10:37
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17 263- You Should Do a Story2017-06-20 19:01:27
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18 262- In the Same Ballpark2017-06-13 23:02:41
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19 Intro to a new Roman Mars podcast: What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law2017-06-08 20:53:04
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20 261- Squatters of the Lower East Side2017-05-30 22:34:04
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